What the fake history of guns can teach us

In 2000, Emory University history professor Michael Bellesiles published the book Arming America: The Origins of a National Gun Culture. The central argument of the book was that the culture of American gun ownership does not date back to the colonial era and, instead, emerged in the middle of the nineteenth century when technological advances made firearms more affordable.

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Deconstructing the anti-gun cult

Before she blocked me last week on Twitter, I frequently read the posts of Shannon Watts, the founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, as well as tweets from former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg and his Everytown for Gun Safety, which is her organization’s chief financial backer. Combined, the two gun control groups are front and center in the U.S.’s anti-gun cult, with 4 million members, which is about the same number of members as the National Rifle Association.

Continue reading “Deconstructing the anti-gun cult”

What the fake history of guns can teach us

In 2000, Emory University history professor Michael Bellesiles published the book Arming America: The Origins of a National Gun Culture. The central argument of the book was that the culture of American gun ownership does not date back to the colonial era and, instead, emerged in the middle of the nineteenth century when technological advances made firearms more affordable.

Continue reading “What the fake history of guns can teach us”